Prada Galleria leather handbag


But Prada’s relevancy appears to be slipping, and it’s not just the Saks shoppers who believe so. Last month, Prada, which also owns Miu Miu, Church’s, and Car Shoe, announced a nine-month decline in net profit. Amounts dropped 27.6 percent to 319.3 million euros (around $427.8 million), compared with the 440.9 million euros, or $582 million, which has been reported in 2013. Talking about this slumping gain, Prada’s chief financial officer Donatello Galli declined to share a 2015 perspective with analysts, though he did state the brand wasn’t expecting any short-term advancements. Prada is currently planning on delaying, or even canceling, the launching of 80 stores which were slated to roll out in 2015. Prada declined to comment to Racked for this story. “This makes you scratch your head and wonder if it’s a blip. . .or if that is turning into a negative tendency.” “We acknowledge that the results are below expectations, but not just for external market conditions, but also for some internal factors,” Galli said. “We need to adapt our company into a circumstance of market volatility. We lacked amounts and probably also new products in some price ranges. “Analysts point to unrest in the Asia Pacific market, which accounts for 38 percent of the brand’s earnings, as a reason why the profits of Prada (in addition to other luxury businesses) have been hurting. Between pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong and China’s recent campaign to crack down on corruption, luxury purchases have stalled.


Couple that with turmoil in Europe (political anxiety in Russia, Spain recovering from a downturn), and also the numbers make even more sense. But as Paul Swinand, a retail analyst with investment research firm MorningStar puts it, “This makes you scratch your head and wonder whether it is a blip to bigger and better things or if that is turning into a negative trend. “International turbulence aside, shoppers agree that the desire for Prada is on the decrease, a fact best illustrated by the state of its leather goods business, which in the past few years has accounted for almost three-quarters of their new bottom line. Handbag-obsessed readers of this website Purseblog post in forums with titles like “Prada Bags: Made in China for Italian-Made Prices” and “Goodbye Prada! .” They posit that the grade is not what it was, which newer, more intriguing It bags are dethroning the brand’s best hits. “I really don’t think people are walking away from the brand entirely, but I’ve seen folks drifting,” says Pattie Rechtman, who conducts Purseblog’s forums. “They are trying new things and losing interest. The totes still seem to resonate, but people who’ve bought the brand in the past are the only ones buying it now. “Avid purse consumers have moved on to cooler new classics such as Proenza Schouler’s PS 1, while lower-end designers have also picked up steam. Michael Kors and Kate Spade churn out reliable products that cost less than Prada’s.


If New York City councilwoman Margaret Chin gets her way, it may soon be illegal to get a fake Prada handbag, or any of the other counterfeits publicly sold in her Chinatown district, the ” ground zero” for New York’s knockoffs. Chin’s projected $1,000 fine for fake purchasers is merely the latest salvo in the war against designer rip-offs waged by the FBI, industry groups, and designers themselves.Yet a preliminary study focused on fake sales in Chinathe source of all those fake handbags in Chinatown and just about anyplace elsesuggests that in several situations the sale of fakes may not be so bad for legitimate brands. The analysis, by Northwestern economist Yi Qian, analyzed that the counterfeit market in the aftermath of well-publicized instances of food poisoning and exploding gas tanks in China, when enforcement efforts were diverted from clarifying style copycats and toward monitoring drugs, food, and gas. Counterfeit factories prospered, but surprisingly, that led to an increase in sales for luxury goods in recent years that followed.When most people today consider the impact of counterfeits on valid brandsand when brands themselves litigate against counterfeitersthey concentrate on the “business stealing” result: Every fake Prada handbag signifies a lost sale for Prada. But a dirty little trick is that Prada rip-offs can also function as free promotion for actual Prada handbagspartly by indicating that the brand’s popularity, but, less obviously, by producing what MIT marketing professor Renee Richardson Gosline has described as a ” gateway” merchandise.


If New York City councilwoman Margaret Chin has her way, it might soon be illegal to own a fake Prada handbag, or some of those other counterfeits publicly offered in her Chinatown district, the ” ground zero” for New York’s knockoffs. Chin’s proposed $1,000 fine for counterfeit buyers is merely the latest salvo in the war against designer rip-offs waged by the FBI, industry groups, and designers themselves.Yet a preliminary research centered on fake sales in Chinathe source of all those fake purses in Chinatown and nearly everywhere elsesuggests that in many situations the selling of fakes may not be quite as bad for brands that are valid. The analysis, by Northwestern economist Yi Qian, analyzed the fake market in the wake of well-publicized instances of food poisoning and exploding gas tanks in China, when enforcement efforts were diverted from clarifying style copycats and toward tracking medications, food, and gasoline. Counterfeit factories prospered, but surprisingly, that led to an increase in sales for luxury products in recent years that followed.When many people think about the impact of counterfeits on valid brandsand when brands themselves litigate against counterfeitersthey concentrate on the “business stealing” result: Every imitation Prada handbag represents a lost sale for Prada. However, a dirty little trick is that Prada rip-offs may also function as free advertising for actual Prada handbagspartly by signaling the brand’s popularity, however, less obviously, by creating what MIT marketing professor Renee Richardson Gosline has described as a ” gateway” merchandise.If New York City councilwoman Margaret Chin has her way, it might soon be illegal to own a fake Prada handbag, or some of those other counterfeits publicly offered in her Chinatown district, the ” ground zero” for New York’s knockoffs. Chin’s proposed $1,000 fine for counterfeit buyers is merely the latest salvo in the war against designer rip-offs waged by the FBI, industry groups, and designers themselves.Yet a preliminary research centered on fake sales in Chinathe source of all those fake purses in Chinatown and nearly everywhere elsesuggests that in many situations the selling of fakes may not be quite as bad for brands that are valid. The analysis, by Northwestern economist Yi Qian, analyzed the fake market in the wake of well-publicized instances of food poisoning and exploding gas tanks in China, when enforcement efforts were diverted from clarifying style copycats and toward tracking medications, food, and gasoline. Counterfeit factories prospered, but surprisingly, that led to an increase in sales for luxury products in recent years that followed.When many people think about the impact of counterfeits on valid brandsand when brands themselves litigate against counterfeitersthey concentrate on the “business stealing” result: Every imitation Prada handbag represents a lost sale for Prada. However, a dirty little trick is that Prada rip-offs may also function as free advertising for actual Prada handbagspartly by signaling the brand’s popularity, however, less obviously, by creating what MIT marketing professor Renee Richardson Gosline has described as a ” gateway” merchandise.If New York City councilwoman Margaret Chin has her way, it might soon be illegal to own a fake Prada handbag, or some of those other counterfeits publicly offered in her Chinatown district, the ” ground zero” for New York’s knockoffs. Chin’s proposed $1,000 fine for counterfeit buyers is merely the latest salvo in the war against designer rip-offs waged by the FBI, industry groups, and designers themselves.Yet a preliminary research centered on fake sales in Chinathe source of all those fake purses in Chinatown and nearly everywhere elsesuggests that in many situations the selling of fakes may not be quite as bad for brands that are valid. The analysis, by Northwestern economist Yi Qian, analyzed the fake market in the wake of well-publicized instances of food poisoning and exploding gas tanks in China, when enforcement efforts were diverted from clarifying style copycats and toward tracking medications, food, and gasoline. Counterfeit factories prospered, but surprisingly, that led to an increase in sales for luxury products in recent years that followed.When many people think about the impact of counterfeits on valid brandsand when brands themselves litigate against counterfeitersthey concentrate on the “business stealing” result: Every imitation Prada handbag represents a lost sale for Prada. However, a dirty little trick is that Prada rip-offs may also function as free advertising for actual Prada handbagspartly by signaling the brand’s popularity, however, less obviously, by creating what MIT marketing professor Renee Richardson Gosline has described as a ” gateway” merchandise.


Automobiles are packed into New York’s Saks Fifth Avenue flagship one recent winter evening, gift cards in tow and post-holiday deals in effect. Chatting with women in the department store’s luxury handbag section, it’s simple to gather which brands inspire the maximum excitement these days: there are classics such as Goyard and Cline and newer kids on the block like Proenza Schouler and Alexander Wang. But one of the labels Saks shoppers turn off, there is a marked lack of a style powerhouse: Prada.I watch the new as something my mom owns,Amy Lewis, a tourist out of Chicago, clarifies. I suppose I think that they’re outdated? I am just not interested. I understand they have vintage pieces, but they are not something I’d invest in. They’re like in-your-face luxe and that I prefer the more subdued.Liza Grace, a makeup artist from New Jersey, agrees: Perhaps I’d have bought a pocket or clutch years ago, but it’s not a business I am going to always be checking in on.Family-run for three centuries, the 102-year-old Italian manufacturer has long been synonymous with all capital-F Fashionthe devil wears Prada, after all. Miuccia Prada’s smart, bizarre designs have won over legions of lovers, which has in turn translated into a great deal of cash. In 2013, the business reported a net income of 3.59 billion euro, roughly $4.2 billion.


If New York City councilwoman Margaret Chin has her way, it might soon be illegal to get a fake Prada handbag, or any of the other counterfeits openly offered in her Chinatown district, the ” ground zero” for New York’s knockoffs. Chin’s proposed $1,000 fine for fake purchasers is only the most recent salvo in the war against designer rip-offs waged by the FBI, business groups, and designers themselves.Yet a preliminary research focused on counterfeit earnings in Chinathe supply of all those fake purses in Chinatown and nearly anyplace elsesuggests that in several situations the selling of fakes might not be quite as bad for brands that are valid. The analysis, by Northwestern economist Yi Qian, examined that the counterfeit market in the aftermath of well-publicized instances of food poisoning and exploding gas tanks in China, when authorities efforts were redirected from policing fashion copycats and toward tracking medications, food, and gasoline. Counterfeit factories flourished, but surprisingly, this resulted in an increase in sales for high-end goods in the years that followed.When most people today consider the effect of counterfeits on valid brandsand when brands themselves litigate against counterfeitersthey concentrate on the “business stealing” effect: Every imitation Prada handbag represents a lost sale for Prada. However, a dirty little trick is that Prada rip-offs may also serve as free promotion for real Prada handbagspartly by signaling the brand’s popularity, but, less obviously, by producing what MIT advertising scientist Renee Richardson Gosline has described as a ” gateway” merchandise.

style details

The timelessly chic Galleria handbag from Prada comes crafted from the smoothest leather for a sumptuous feel with the gold hardware at the front ensuring instant recognition. Offered in a black hue, the bag will become a great accompaniment to a dark-hued tailored suit.

  • material: calf leather
  • internal details: fabric lining, three internal compartments, internal zipped pocket, internal slot pocket
  • colour of fastening: gold
  • detachable shoulder strap, top handles
  • zipped top, open top
  • Made in Italy
  • comes with dust bag
  • Designer colour name: Nero
  • Detail: snap-buttoned sides for adjustable width
size & fit

  • Height 23cm-9″
  • Width 31cm-12″
  • Depth 15cm-6″
  • Length shoulder strap 94cm-37″
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